2015 · commercial fiction · fiction · Penguin Random House UK · psychological thrillers · Uncategorized

The Girl On The Train review

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I have finally read this baby and now I know what all the hype is all about. Devoured within three days reading this going to and from work on the tube, The Girl On The Train will be one of those books that will happily join my never ending collection of books.

The Girl On The Train is about an alcoholic woman named Rachel who travels the same train journey every morning in to London. Like every morning, the train waits at the same signal upon where Rachel has a moment or two to look out at the houses. She notices the same house with the same couple living there, but one day, when Rachel sees something inconceivable she can’t help but get involved in the mystery.

I really liked the narrative structure, which switches from Rachel and Megan allowing us to understand the plot from the two women’s perspectives. The protagonist Rachel is a flawed character who is not particularly likeable, however, possessing a strong moral sense of doing the right thing, her perseverance and willingness to help is admirable, despite the ways in which she does so.

All the main characters were well developed and felt very much real to me. They would prance around in my mind and I’d often think about them when I was not reading – only a gripping book like Girl On The Train will have this affect on you.

The plot had lots of twists and turns, which inevitably kept me wanting to read more and more as I, like Rachel, also wanted to understand what had happened to Megan and how this had affected the other characters.

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My favourite part of the book is when we first hear of Megan’s voice through the narrative, where she explains the reasons why certain actions in her past were taken. Having not adjusted to the fact that Megan’s narrative is the lady that Rachel allocates a different name and life to is extremely satisfying when we finally understand what Paula Hawkins does there.

The ending was great too, Rachel telling us she has to get up early in the morning to catch the train, to me, was the perfect way to end.

I also think the idea behind the book was simple yet interesting. Paula Hawkins was once on a train when her train stopped at a signal and she looked out of her window to the houses nearby the tracks. She wondered what it would be like to write about every day situations and people, and voila, the idea was born.

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This was without a doubt a page-turner – a fantastic read and I would highly recommend it to anyone who is in to psychological thrillers.

 

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